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Adam Danyal
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adamdanyal

Adam Danyal
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For all enquiries use [email protected]
Exploring the web for useful products!
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Microsoft Submerged Data Centers Underwater, Here’s What This Experiment Discovered Years Later…

When in need of more data storage, head to the deep blue sea! That’s what Microsoft did when it ventured to the shores of Scotland’s Orkney Islands to conduct a research project to determine the feasibility of underwater datacenters powered by offshore renewable energy. It’s called Project Natick, and it’s been years in the making. With two phases now under its belt, Project Natick’s mission is to explore manufacturing and operating energy self-sufficient underwater datacenters that can deliver super-fast cloud services to coastal cities.

More than half of the world’s population reportedly lives within about 120 miles of the coast. Therefore, these underwater datacenters near coastal cities would only require the data to travel a short distance to reach coastal communities. This would result in quick and seamless web surfing, video streaming, and game-playing, including authentic experiences for AI-driven technologies. Additional benefits from these sustainable underwater data centers could include deployment in regions of the world with unreliable electricity, or those that are facing a terrorist attack, or a natural disaster. Plus, it could rule out the need for costly backup generators in the event of power grid failures.

On land, data centers encounter problems, such as corrosion from oxygen and humidity. However, in a tightly-sealed environment with strict temperature control like these subsea data centers, fewer issues arise. According to Microsoft, the underwater data center had just one-eighth the failure rate of a land-based data center. For example, in the retrieved data center in 2018, only eight out of the 855 servers on board had failed. That’s pretty impressive considering it was down on the seafloor for a couple of years!

In order to pull this off, Microsoft collaborated with Naval Group, “a 400-year old France-based company with global expertise in engineering, manufacturing and maintaining military-grade ships and submarines as well as marine energy technologies.” Ultimately, Microsoft’s clever experiment could potentially reshape the foundation of Microsoft’s business, the computer technology industry as a whole, and energy efficiency as we know it.

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