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Adam Danyal
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adamdanyal

Adam Danyal
Entrepreneur
For all enquiries use [email protected]
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This Jet-Powered Car Aims to be the Fastest Car on the Planet

Meet mighty Bloodhound LSR, a British land vehicle designed to travel at supersonic speeds with the goal to set a new world land speed record. Built with a fierce arrow shape, this speed demon is powered by a Rolls Royce EJ 200 engine – the same engine found in a Euro-fighter Typhoon! It’s the most advanced straight-line racing car ever built.

This red and white monstrous car jet conducted a successful high-speed testing campaign in the Kalahari Desert, South Africa in 2019 where it reached a hair-raising speed of 628 mph (or 1011 km/h)! To put things into perspective, its acceleration goes from 50mph to 334mph in just 13 seconds! The goal is to ultimately attempt a new world land speed record, with a speed above 800mph, or more precisely 1,000mph.

Back in October of 1997, the ThrustSSC, a twin turbofan jet-powered car driven by Andy Green claimed the Outright World Land Speed Record, clocking in at 763.035 mph (or 1227.985 km/h) over one mile. This marked the first supersonic record as it exceeded the sound barrier at Mach 1.016.

Reaching the speed of 628 mph (or 1011 km/h) validated the computer modeling used in designing the car and proved that Bloodhound LSR has what it takes to break the 1997 record. What needs to be done now is to install the “’ green’ Nammo monopropellant rocket with a battery-powered fuel system.” This will enable the jet car to reach its desired a top-speed of over 800 mph (1287 km/h), substantially breaking the speed of sound.

While there have been some delays to the UK-based project due to the pandemic and the need for more funding via sponsors, the objective is to have the Bloodhound LSR return to South Africa in 2023. There, it will return to its glory on its exclusively prepared 12-mile (19.2 km) long dry lakebed racetrack on the Hakskeen Pan.

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